Spotlight
Family Court Practice, The
Order the 2021 edition due out in May
Court of Protection Practice 2021
'Court of Protection Practice goes from strength to strength, having...
Jackson's Matrimonial Finance Tenth Edition
Jackson's Matrimonial Finance is an authoritative specialist text...
Spotlight
Latest articles
JM v RM [2021] EWHC 315 (Fam)
(Family Division, Mostyn J, 22 February 2021)Abduction – Wrongful retention – Hague Convention application – Mother decided not to return to Australia with children – COVID 19...
Re A (A Child) (Hague Convention 1980: Set Aside) [2021] EWCA Civ 194
(Court of Appeal (Civil Division), Moylan, Asplin LJJ, Hayden J, 23 February 2021)Abduction – Hague Convention 1980 – Return order made – Mother successfully applied to set aside due...
Disabled women more than twice as likely to experience domestic abuse
The latest data from the Office of National Statistics shows that, in the year ending March 2020, around 1 in 7 (14.3%) disabled people aged 16 to 59 years experienced any form of domestic abuse in...
The President of the Family Division endorses Public Law Working Group report
The Courts and Tribunals Judiciary has published a message from the President of the Family Division, Sir Andrew McFarlane, in which the President endorses the publication of the President’s...
HMCTS updates online divorce services guidance
HM Courts and Tribunals Service have recently updated the online divorce services guidance with the addition of guides for deemed and dispensed service applications, alternative service...
View all articles
Authors

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act comes into force

Sep 29, 2018, 17:43 PM
Slug : human-fertilisation-and-embryology-act-comes-into-force
Meta Title :
Meta Keywords :
Canonical URL :
Trending Article : No
Prioritise In Trending Articles : No
Date : Oct 1, 2009, 08:48 AM
Article ID : 90129

The single greatest change to affect the UK fertility sector in nearly two decades will take place today, as the new Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 (as amended) comes into force.

The revised legislation will bring a new range of changes. Donor conceived people and donors will have greater rights of access to information about their donor, their siblings or the children born as a result of their donation.

Children conceived by egg or sperm donation will have the chance to find their biological siblings once they turn 18 if they both consent.

Scientific researchers will be able to access the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority's (HFEA) Register, one of the oldest and most comprehensive sources of historical data on fertility treatment in the world.

Other changes which will come into effect with the new legislation include: increasing the length of time people can store their embryos; a 'cooling off' period if one partner withdraws consent for embryo storage; banning sex selection for non medical reasons, and; allowing female civil partners to be registered as the legal parents.

Chair of the HFEA Prof Lisa Jardine said: "Fertility treatment and social attitudes have changed radically in the past 20 years and the law was ripe for an update. New and developing technologies mean that people who never dreamed they could have a child, now can. Scientists are carrying out research that was unthought of when the first act was drafted, but that is now helping us to better understand embryo development and genetic disease.

"As the regulator of fertility treatment and embryo research, we have to make decisions about issues that bring together ethics and health, science and family life, about complex technologies and innovative treatments. This new Act provides a clear framework for the future and a solid base on which to regulate 21st century practice within 21st century law."

Categories :
  • News
Tags :
Authors
Provider :
Product Bucket :
Recommend These Products
Related Articles
Load more comments
Comment by from