Latest articles
Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust v DV (A Child) [2021] EWHC 1037 (Fam)
(Family Division, Cohen J, 19 April 2021)Medical Treatment – 17-year-old had form of bone cancer and required surgery For comprehensive, judicially approved coverage of every important...
Domestic Abuse Bill
Aaron Gates-Lincoln, Immigration NewsAfter years of development the Domestic Abuse Bill returned to the House of Lords in the UK on the 8th March 2021 to complete its report stage, one of the final...
Coercive control and children’s welfare in Re H-N and Others
When families come to strife, arrangements must be made for the future care of any children. In some circumstances, this means an application to the courts. These ‘private law orders’ can...
Profession: Expert Witness
The value of a family business or business interest is treated as an asset and therefore part of the matrimonial pot to be distributed when it comes to negotiating a financial settlement on divorce or...
How does a jointly held property pass on death?
When meeting with clients to discuss their succession planning, many cannot recall whether their property is held jointly as joint tenants or jointly as tenants in common. The distinction is that with...
View all articles
Authors

Study disputes independent social workers cause delays in family courts

Sep 29, 2018, 21:30 PM
Slug : ISW-Oxford-Research-16042012-357
Meta Title :
Meta Keywords :
Canonical URL :
Trending Article : No
Prioritise In Trending Articles : No
Date : Apr 19, 2012, 08:30 AM
Article ID : 98279

ChildNew research published today from Oxford University claims that delays could be reduced in family courts by the earlier appointment of independent social work experts (ISWs).

The research was commissioned by the Confederation of Independent Social Work Agencies last July in response to mounting criticisms of the work of ISWs which led to the Legal Services Commission's decision to cap ISW fees at a rate lower than other professional experts. The Family Justice Review was also persuaded by these criticisms and the Government accepted its recommendations that the use of ISWs should be exceptional.

Typically, ISWs have been criticised for causing delay, duplicating or ‘checking' the work of local authority social workers and for producing poor reports.

However the Oxford study examined ISWs reports and found that they added value in cases of high complexity. The researchers found that the reports provided transparent, forensic, evidence-based assessments which gave clarity around complex issues, supporting better welfare decision-making for children and families within Family Courts.

John Simmonds, Director of Policy, Research and Development at the British Association for Adoption and Fostering (BAAF) commented: "The research from Oxford University provides real insight into this work and a positive perspective on the professionalism of the social workers.  It is clear that there needs to be a re-evaluation of the negative picture that is currently driving reform. This must include a robust evaluation of what is at danger of being lost to court processes that make life changing decisions on the future of children."

The research was conducted by Dr Julia Brophy and her colleagues at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at Oxford University and the findings from the first stage are published in their report: The Contribution Of Experts In Care Proceedings: Evaluation Of The Work Of Independent Social Work Assessments.

Categories :
  • News
Tags :
Authors
Provider :
Product Bucket :
Recommend These Products
Load more comments
Comment by from